Category Archives: Educational

Apple Company History from 2000- 2004

By Glen Sanford
Source: apple-history.com


The second half of 2000 was rocky for Apple. Slower sales (both for Apple and the industry as a whole), combined with a misunderstanding of the consumer market resulted in the first unprofitable quarter in three years. One factor in this decline was the G4 Cube, which sold poorly due primarily to its high price compared to Apple’s other products. Another factor was Apple’s decision to include DVD-ROM drives in their consumer and professional machines instead of CD-RW drives. As a result, Apple missed sales opportunities to customers who wanted to burn their own CDs. Apple began to rectify these problems in late 2000, when it cut prices on the entire PowerMac line. Apple took the next step in January of 2001, when it announced a new line of PowerMacs, with either CD-RW drives or a new “SuperDrive” which could read and write both CDs and DVDs. Apple also announced two new application: iDVD, a DVD-authoring program, and iTunes, which allowed users to encode and listen to MP3 songs, and then burn them to CDs.

All this was part of Apple’s new corporate strategy, developed in the face of a massive slow down in the Technology industry: Apple would take advantage of the explosion of personal electronic devices–CD-players, MP3 players, digital cameras, DVD-players, etc.–by building Mac-only applications that added value to those devices. Just as iMovie had added tremendous value to Digital Cameras, iDVD would add value to Digital Cameras and to DVD-players, and iTunes would add value to CD and MP3 players. It was Apple’s hope that making the Mac the “Digital Hub” of the new “Digital Lifestyle” would revitalize Apple’s sales and guarantee the long-term security of the company.

In May 2001, Steve Jobs announced that Apple would be…

Read the Full Story at apple-history.com

Disclaimer: Urbanfloor is not related or affiliated with Apple, Inc. and does not gain any monetary benefit by referring Apple products.  Recommendations are voluntary and solely based on our own experience. iMac, iPad, iPod Touch and Apple, Inc. are registered trademarks of their respective owners.

Apple Company History from 1997- 2000

By Glen Sanford
Source: apple-history.com

Steve Jobs in 2000

Jobs’ presence was known almost as quickly as NeXT was acquired. The degree of Jobs’ “expanded role” soon became quite clear. With no CEO and Apple Stock lower than it had been in 5 years, there were many decisions to be made, and not much time to make them. Jobs began to make striking changes in the structure of Apple, including the canceling of the Newton spin-off. (The Newton was discontinued several months later.) The time and place for the most ground breaking announcements, however, would be MacWorld Boston in August 1997.

Jobs, who by now was being referred to as “interim CEO,” made the keynote speech, and spoke of the company’s upcoming aggressive advertising campaign, upcoming new Macs, and Rhapsody. He also announced an almost entirely new Board of Directors, including Larry Ellison, CEO of Oracle. But he saved the best for last. In a ground breaking decision, Jobs announced an alliance with Microsoft. In exchange for $150 million in Apple Stock, Microsoft and Apple would have a 5-year patent cross-license and, more importantly, a final settlement in the ongoing GUI argument. Microsoft agreed to pay an unreleased sum of additional funds to quiet the allegations that it had stolen Apple’s intellectual property in designing its Windows OS. Microsoft also announced that Office ’98, its popular office package, would be available for the Mac by years end.

These announcements gave Apple new life, but Jobs was not finished. There was one more big obstacle to tackle:

Read the Full Story at apple-history.com

 

Disclaimer: Urbanfloor is not related or affiliated with Apple, Inc. and does not gain any monetary benefit by referring Apple products.  Recommendations are voluntary and solely based on our own experience. iMac, iPad, iPod Touch and Apple, Inc. are registered trademarks of their respective owners.

Apple Company History from 1996-1997

By Glen Sanford
Source: apple-history.com

Gil Amelio & Steve Jobs

Amelio made a strong effort to bring Apple back to profitability, but his efforts would prove to be largely unsuccessful. Following his first 100 days as CEO, Amelio announced broad changes in the corporate structure of the company. The company was to be split into 7 separate divisions, each responsible for its own profit or loss. He has also made an effort to keep developers and customers better informed about the day-to-day affairs of the company. Although the company announced a staggering $740 million loss for Q1 1996, they brought that loss down to $33 million for Q2, beating all estimates by the best financial experts. In Q3 Apple profited nearly $30 million, again astounding financial experts, who had predicted a loss of as much. (Apple lost considerably more in Q4.)

In late december 1996, Apple made an industry-shattering announcement that…

Read the Full Story at apple-history.com

 

Disclaimer: Urbanfloor is not related or affiliated with Apple, Inc. and does not gain any monetary benefit by referring Apple products.  Recommendations are voluntary and solely based on our own experience. iMac, iPad, iPod Touch and Apple, Inc. are registered trademarks of their respective owners.

Apple Company History from 1993- 1996

By Glen Sanford
Source: apple-history.com

Michael Spindler

Spindler, by all accounts, was the wrong man for the job. A fairly impersonal man, Spindler’s office was nearly impossible to get into. However, in his two and a half years as CEO, Spindler oversaw several accomplishments.

In 1994 Apple announced the PowerMac family, the first Macs to be based on the PowerPC chip, an extremely fast processor co-developed with IBM and Motorola. The PowerPC processor allowed Macs to compete with, and in many cases surpass, the speed of Intel’s newer processors.

Spindler also decided to…

Read the Full Story at apple-history.com

 

Disclaimer: Urbanfloor is not related or affiliated with Apple, Inc. and does not gain any monetary benefit by referring Apple products.  Recommendations are voluntary and solely based on our own experience. iMac, iPad, iPod Touch and Apple, Inc. are registered trademarks of their respective owners.

Apple Company History from 1985- 1993

By Glen Sanford
Source: apple-history.com

Sculley became the de facto head of Apple in May 1985. Over the next few months, Apple was forced to lay off a fifth of its work force, some 1,200 employees. The company also posted its first quarterly loss. All this, and the resignation of Jobs, served to erode confidence in Sculley’s abilities as CEO of Apple.

At the same time, Sculley became locked in a battle with Microsoft’s Bill Gates over the introduction of Windows 1.0, which had many similarities to the Mac GUI. Gates finally agreed to sign a statement to the effect that Microsoft would not use Mac technology in Windows 1.0–it said nothing of future versions of Windows, and Gates’ lawyers made sure it was airtight. Apple had effectively lost exclusive rights to its interface design. This would prove to be an important document in future lawsuits between Apple and Microsoft, involving the Windows interface.

What brought Mac out of the hole were the twin introductions of the LaserWriter, the first affordable PostScript laser printer for the Mac, and PageMaker, one of the first Desktop Publishing programs ever. These two in tandem made the Mac an ideal solution for inexpensive publishing, and the Mac became an overnight success, again.

In 1987, Apple introduced the…
Read the Full Story at apple-history.com

 

Disclaimer: Urbanfloor is not related or affiliated with Apple, Inc. and does not gain any monetary benefit by referring Apple products.  Recommendations are voluntary and solely based on our own experience. iMac, iPad, iPod Touch and Apple, Inc. are registered trademarks of their respective owners.

Apple Company History from 1983- 1985

By Glen Sanford
Source: apple-history.com

Steve Jobs and John Sculley

Although a successful businessman, it soon became clear that Sculley did not know much about the computer industry. He and Jobs were at odds almost immediately. As the announcement of the Macintosh drew closer, Jobs went into hyperdrive. He worked hard to get developers to write programs for the upcoming machine–Jobs had realized that the Mac would ultimately be made or broken by the software industry.

On January 22nd, 1984, during the third quarter of the Super Bowl, Apple aired its infamous 60 second commercial (13.4 MB) introducing the…

Read the Full Story at apple-history.com

 

Disclaimer: Urbanfloor is not related or affiliated with Apple, Inc. and does not gain any monetary benefit by referring Apple products.  Recommendations are voluntary and solely based on our own experience. iMac, iPad, iPod Touch and Apple, Inc. are registered trademarks of their respective owners.

Apple Company History From 1981- 1983

Steve Jobs

By Glen Sanford
Source: apple-history.com

Following the historic visit to Xerox PARC in 1979, Jobs and several other engineers began to develop the Lisa, which would redefine personal computing. Jobs, however, proved to be a poor project manager, and was taken off the Lisa by Mike Markkula, then president of Apple, and one of the major stockholders. Jobs, who owned only 11% of Apple, decided to take over someone else’s project, and began working with the Macintosh–which had started as…

Read the Full Story at apple-history.com

 

Disclaimer: Urbanfloor is not related or affiliated with Apple, Inc. and does not gain any monetary benefit by referring Apple products.  Recommendations are voluntary and solely based on our own experience. iMac, iPad, iPod Touch and Apple, Inc. are registered trademarks of their respective owners.

Apple Company History From 1976-1981

Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak- History Being Made!

By Glen Sanford
Source: apple-history.com

Steven Wozniak and Steve Jobs had been friends in high school.  They had both been interested in electronics, and both had been perceived as outsiders.  They kept in touch after graduation, and both ended up dropping out of school and getting jobs working for companies in Silicon Valley. (Wozniak for Hewlett-Packard, Jobs for Atari)

Wozniak had been dabbling in computer-design for some time when, in 1976, he designed what would become the Apple I. Jobs, who had an eye for the future, insisted that he and Wozniak try to sell the machine, and on April 1, 1976, Apple Computer was born.

Hobbyists did not take the Apple I very seriously, and Apple did not begin to take off until…

Read the Full Story at apple-history.com

 

Disclaimer: Urbanfloor is not related or affiliated with Apple, Inc. and does not gain any monetary benefit by referring Apple products.  Recommendations are voluntary and solely based on our own experience. iMac, iPad, iPod Touch and Apple, Inc. are registered trademarks of their respective owners.

Ron Call’s Tip of the Week #010- Asbestos Safety When Installing Your Hardwood Floors

Tip of the Week
Saturday, May 26, 2012
by Ron Call, your Urbanfloor guy

Ron Call, your Urbanfloor Guy

DYI tip of the week.  If you’re planning on installing your own floor either gluing direct, nailing or using the floating method one thing you might not have considered especially if you have an older home built before the late 1980′s is asbestos.

A lot of these homes were originally built using base grade VAT (Vinyl Asbestos Tile) as a floor covering.  You may still be walking on it today, or it may be hidden under the carpet or vinyl flooring you are thinking about replacing.  In any case if the tiles on your floor are 9″ x 9″ or are secured by an adhesive that looks like black tar, there is a real good chance that it contains asbestos. Both the tiles and the adhesive may contain asbestos.

Asbestos is a known carcinogen that can cause cancer.  You should NOT attempt to remove or alter this tile or adhesive in any way.  It is against Federal Law and you may possibly contaminate your home.  The problem is not that it is in your home, as long as it remains undisturbed it will not cause any health concerns.  The problems can come from the improper removal and disposal.

If you were planning a glued direct method, you will need to find a certified asbestos abatement contractor to properly remove and dispose of the tile and the adhesive residue.  Even disposing of the tile in a regular land fill is against the law, so do not attempt to do this yourself.  You are risking your families health and major fines if you are caught.  Now if you find that you have this in your home you can still install your new floor without removal if you use the floating method.

If your floor is flat with in a tolerance (see the specs that came with your floor) just install right over the tiles. You can use a good self-leveling concrete patch to fill any low spots (just go right over the tiles).  If you have any high spots that need grinding, STOP and contact your certified asbestos abatement contractor.

If you improperly try to grind the high spots you WILL contaminate your home and put your family at risk.  If you are not sure if your flooring contains asbestos, for safety sake just assume that it does.  You can have it tested for about $50.00 depending on the area of the country you live in.  It is almost always impossible to tell the difference between VAT (Vinyl Asbestos Tile) and VCT (Vinyl Composite Tile).  If you have your certified abatement contractor remove the tiles and adhesive residue for you, be sure he gives you a Clean Air Certificate upon completion.  This will certify that your home is safe to occupy and the air safe to breath.  Once this is done install away…

Have questions about a project you’re working on?  Need advice?  For answers post a comment below or visit the Ask Ron page HERE

Ron Call’s Tip of the Week #009- Keep Your Furniture from Sliding Across the Floor

Tip of the Week
Friday, May 18, 2012
by Ron Call, your Urbanfloor guy

Ron Call, your Urbanfloor Guy

Last week I talked about how to protect your hardwood floors from being scratched by your furniture by using felt pads under the legs of chairs and tables.  As a follow up to that, do you have young kids in your home that like to use your couches as a trampoline?

Kids love to play and jump on furniture.  The problem is that when they jump from couch to couch they tend to slide around on the slick surface of the wood floor.  To prevent your furniture from sliding around after you place your felt pads under the feet, head out to your local hardware store.

There you will find rubber mesh material typically used to line cabinet drawers and shelves.  Cut them to fit under the legs of your furniture with a pair of scissors and place them under the legs of your couches or any other piece of furniture that you don’t want to easily be moved.  Now your kids can pretend to be the next Olympic champion or the next super avenger and furniture will stay in place.

Have flooring questions?  Need expert help?  Need expert advice?  Just Ask Ron HERE

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